Bacon Scallion Scones

IMG_8067.jpg

I grew up in a household where both my brother and I were asked at the dinner table whether we liked any boys or girls at school. No, this doesn’t mean did my brother like girls and did I like any boys. It meant, simply, do either of you like anyone of any gender? My mom was probing to say the least. As I got older, I rolled my eyes at her and ran off with my football player boyfriend.

A few months ago when I told my mom I was dating my co-worker Erika, she exclaimed over the phone, “Oh, I have always wanted a lesbian in the family.”

Was the fact that I nursed until I was two years old a self-fulfilling-prophecy for my love for boobs or love for food?

I am dating my co-worker lady best friend at a food delivery company. Heh.

Last fall, I took my favorite sweet scone recipe and tried to make it savory. It turned into a confused pastry that was strangely endearing and impossibly addicting – not unlike my relationship.

Erika and I ate nearly the whole batch while sitting on the couch watching The L Word. That’s right – screw you Jenny Schecter.

Makes 8 scones//Not really, but kind of, from America’s Test Kitchen

  • 16 tablespoons unsalted butter, frozen whole
  • 5 slices of thick cut bacon (cooked and crumbled or chopped)
  • 1/2 cup chopped scallions
  • 1/3 cup sharp white cheddar
  • 1/2 cup whole milk
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 egg yolk
  • Maldon Sea Salt (optional)

Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 425 degrees.  Line baking sheet with parchment paper.

Score and remove half of wrapper from each stick of butter. Grate unwrapped ends on large wholes of box grater (grate a total of 8 tablespoons). Place grated butter in freezer until needed. You will not need the remaining 8 tablespoons, so go ahead and put it away.  Whisk milk and sour cream together in a medium bowl and refrigerate until needed.

Whisk flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt together in medium bowl. Add frozen, grated butter and toss with fingers until thoroughly coated. Fold in chilled milk mixture with a spatula until just combined. Fold in scallions, bacon bits and cheese. Do not over mix.

Turn dough and any floury bits out onto a well-floured counter. Lightly flour hands and dough and then knead it 6 to 8 times until it just holds together in a ball.

Flour your surface again because my dough stuck to the counter at first and made a huge mess. Roll dough out into a 12-inch square. Fold sides in to make a long rectangle. Then fold sides in again to make a 4-inch square. Transfer dough to a lightly floured plate and put in freezer for 5 minutes (do not over chill).

Transfer dough to lightly floured counter and roll again into 12-inch square. Loosen dough from surface and roll it into a log, then pinch the ends closed. Lay dough seam side down and press into 12 by 4-inch rectangle. Using floured chef’s knife, slice dough crosswise into 4 equal rectangles. Then slice each rectangle on a diagonal into 2 triangles.

Place scones on prepared baking sheet. Beat 1 egg yolk with a splash of water. Brush with the egg wash and sprinkle lightly with Maldon sea salt. Bake until scone tops are golden brown, 18 to 25 minutes. There may be grease from the cheese/bacon/butter spilling into the pan, but don’t worry, that will just create crispy cheese bits. Transfer to a wire rack to cool.

IMG_2456IMG_2460IMG_2462

Advertisements

Parsley & Scallion Savory Scones

IMG_1445

Having just finished my first shift working at Irwin’s Neighborhood Bakery & Cafe, I’m posting my sort-of-whole-wheat-scones to celebrate. I will be mostly baking at Irwin’s, but today I learned the art of being a barista. I tried my hand at latte art, successfully and accidentally making a tooth design with foam.

Situated on the corner of Badgley and 40th street, the robin’s egg blue bakery serves many regulars. Liz, the patient soul who trained me, knew nearly everyone who came in by their name.

These particular scones were an accident in my own kitchen. I tried following another recipe but didn’t have most of the ingredients, so I just winged it and ended up loving the nutty, wholesome flavor of whole wheat flour. The subtle tang of lemon is somewhat surprising, but I think it’s what makes them special. I’m a sucker for most anything savory and baked with scallions. They’re great fresh out of the oven on their own, or split in half and spread with butter or goat cheese and sprinkled with sea salt.

Makes 12 scones

  • 1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 cup whole wheat pastry flour
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 10 tablespoons (1 1/4 sticks) cold unsalted butter, cubed
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 2 tablespoons thinly sliced scallions
  • 1/3 cup finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 cup buttermilk

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Combine white flour, wheat flour, sugar, salt, pepper, baking powder and baking soda in a large bowl. Cut the butter into the dry mixture using a pastry blender, until the butter is in the size of peas or smaller.

Stir the lemon zest, scallions and parsley into the dry mixture. Gradually add the buttermilk, stirring until the dough comes together.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead with your hands until it comes together into a ball. Divide the dough into two parts, and pat each piece into a flat round about 1/2-inch thick. Cut each round into six wedges.

Place the scones on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Baked until golden, about 20-25 minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack and serve warm.